A Quick Guide to Statutory Paternity Pay (SPP)

SPP stands for Statutory Paternity Pay. If you qualify then you can take either 1 week or 2 consecutive weeks leave. Leave cannot start before the baby if born. The start date of SPP can be:

  • The actual date of birth
  • An agreed amount of days after the date of birth
  • An agreed amount of days after the expected week of childbirth

You can take unpaid leave to go to antenatal appoints if:

  • You are the baby’s father
  • The expectant mother’s spouse or civil partner
  • In a long-term relationship with the expectant mother
  • The intended parent (they are having a baby through a surrogacy arrangement)

To qualify to SPP you must be:

  • The father
  • Husband or partner of the mother
  • Childs adopter
  • The intended parent (they are having a baby through a surrogacy arrangement)

You must also:

  • Be classed as an employee
  • Be employed up to the date the child is born
  • Be on the payroll and earn above the Lower Earnings limit in an 8-week relevant period
  • Give the correct notice
  • Be taking time off to look after the child or your partner
  • Be responsible for the child’s upbringing
  • Have been continuously employed for at least 26 weeks up to any day in the qualifying week

If you are not eligible for SPP then your employer must issue you with an SPP1 Form (could we link
the SPP1 form here?)

More Information

  • Forms & Downloads
  • Statutory Paternity Pay (SPP) Rates – 2019/2020